Yappy Hour is Coming to the Draught Horse

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The Draught Horse will be hosting the first annual Yappy Hour on October 23 from 7:00 to 11:00 PM.

Yappy Hour is ran by an Entrepreneurial Marketing group called “Puptown Girls.” These girls have a passion for animals and have partnered with Morris Animal Refuge for this event. Morris Animal Refuge has helped homeless and abandoned pets in the Philadelphia region since 1874.

At Yappy Hour, guests can pay a cover fee of just $5 to indulge in discounted drinks and meals, and they even can play with dogs from the shelters. All of the proceeds will go toward the Morris Animal Refuge.

Come down to the Draught Horse for this fun and charitable event, and watch the Eagles vs. Redskins game while playing with pups.

Temple Theater Presents “Guys and Dolls”

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Temple Theaters is bringing a classic musical to the Randall Theater.

“Guys and Dolls” tells the story of a gambler and missionary. The production is being directed by former MFA alumni Peter Reynolds.

“The musical is about a gambler who finds love with a mission worker named Sarah Brown,” says Reynolds.

 

The musical was made into a film in 1955, starring Marlon Brando and Frank Sinatra. However, Reynolds said like so many other Broadway musical productions adapted into film, some changes were made.

“It’s pretty true to quite a bit of the Broadway musical, but with changes. I mean added some songs for Frank Sinatra, because he was Frank Sinatra, and different locations, and because it was Marlon Brando some changes were made that way to accommodate him,” said Reynolds.

Senior Theater Major, Salvatore Mirando, is no stranger to musical production. Mirando is reprising his role as Nicely Nicely Johnson, which he also played when he was in eighth grade.

“Nicely Nicely Johnson is the right hand to Nathan Detroit, so he does all of his shady back dealings. He has to deal with all of Nathan’s antics and he has a great number at the end of the show called ‘Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat’ is the showstopper, so yeah he’s just a real easy-going funny guy,” says Mirando.

“Guys and Dolls” is now showing at the Randall theater until October 22nd. General admission tickets are $25 and for Temple students, tickets are $10. To find out more information visit the event page here.

27th Annual Outfest Hosted in Philly

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For many LGBTQ members, it is often hard to find a place of comfort to be themselves. Events like Philadelphia’s 27th annual Outfest are designed for the LGTBQ community to come out essentially and have fun with friends and family.

Drag shows, games, bar crawls were just some of the events that are featured at the 27th celebration of Outfest, which was hosted by Philly Pride, a local Gay Pride organization.

Drag shows were a popular part of Outfest.

“When we get together, we try to provide each other with tools, so we can go back to our impoverished parish communities, so we bring about more LGTBQ-inclusive change,” says Seth Jacobson, a volunteer from a Catholic church community that accepts LGBTQ members.

“I think discrimination needs to stop, it doesn’t matter who you are, we all bleed the same color,” says Frank Rosario, founder of the LGBT Bill of Rights.

Temple students, church volunteers, Philly residents, and Temple alumni were just some of the people spotted at Outfest. This year’s event also featured musical performances by LGBTQ members.

“Those of you who feel like you don’t belong to anything, there’s a community here waiting to take you with open arms,” says David Doty, a Temple Law student.

This year’s Outfest ran from 12 PM to 6 PM, and was hosted on 13th and Locust in Center City.

For more information on the LGBT Bill of Rights visit lgbtbacker.com.

National Coming Out Week Drag Show

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As part of National Coming Out Week, Temple hosted its 6th annual Drag Show on October 2nd from 7 to 10 PM.

Hosted by Drag Queen Kiara Genae, the show featured performances by Temple University Dance Company, D2D. Third place winner Ms. Lee’s emotional performance wowed the crowd. Second place winner, Ms. Penny, started her routine with an original rap and later on performed I Wanna Be Your Man by Zapp and Roger. First place winner, Sakura Allure, transformed into Cardi B and returned to the stage for their rendition of Do You Think Of Me by Misha B.

Drag Show Judge Kalen Allen has been attending the show for four years. He is impressed by the performances and energy from the crowd every year. He believes that the number of students getting involved in National Coming Out Week events will continue to grow by Friday.

Students Kate Whalley and Haydn Williams found the performances emotional and uplifting. They felt that students appreciated the art of the Drag Show, even though they are not a part of the LGBTQIA community.

Temple Student Government President Tyrell Mann-Barnes emphasized that the show’s message was solidarity. He spoke about the Owl Promise initiative and TUnity statement. Barnes urges students to accept everyone’s race, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic background since it makes Temple’s campus unique and diverse.

Other events during the week included Come Out, Speak Out (Tuesday) and Queer Lunch (Wednesday). The two other events coming up this week are State of the LGBTQIA + Issues Townhall on Thursday from 6:30 to 7:30 PM and NCOW Fest on Friday from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM.

So Far Sound Philadelphia

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On Wednesday, September 20th, many music lovers attended a concert in Rittenhouse Square.

However, this is not the typical concert. This show was organized by an online music community called So Far Sound. According to Carolyn Lederach, organizer for So Far Sound Philadelphia, the organization was started by two guys who wanted to take the normal venue atmosphere and move to a more a relaxing atmosphere in people’s houses.

“They noticed everyone talking over the music and more focused on catching up with their friends and drinking than paying attention to the music. They kind of wanted to take music out of that atmosphere and bring it to homes,” says Lederach.

One the performers at the show is indie rock and Philly band, Maitland. For lead singer Josh Hines, playing in a smaller setting can be fun and nerve-racking.“Playing So Far shows and more intimate rooms and spaces is really, really fun for me. It’s really nerve-racking because there’s just a certain amount of like visibility when you’re in a small space. It’s a little different when you’re on a big stage and the lights blind you from seeing everybody that’s out there,” says Hines.

Getting into So Far Sound shows can be a difficult. Because the shows are held in small rooms, only a certain amount of people who sign up for tickets can attend the show.

“You just go to our website sofarsounds.com, look for the closest city and then you can just sign up on there and the dates will be listed on there,” says Lederach.

To find out more about upcoming shows in Philadelphia visit sofarsounds.com. 

Terror Behind the Walls is Back

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Terror Behind the Walls is back in Philadelphia. Opening day was last Friday, September 22, and Temple Update was there to get a sneak peak.

Terror Behind the Walls is a massive haunted house that is located inside of a real prison. It features six attractions that people are able to walk through.

Its newest attraction is called Blood Yard, which focuses on the prisoners that were left in prison. This attraction shows what the prisoners had to do to survive.

Terror Behind the Walls also provides a “After Dark VIP” tour where people can get an hour-long guided flashlight tour. There is also an option to order a Hex pass. Hex passes allow patrons to enter six secret rooms before each attraction, where they are dared to step further into the story.

Outside of general admission, discounted student tickets are also available. This promotion is only available during student days, which are every Sunday starting at 7:30pm.

Tickets are available online or at the venue. More information can be found at https://www.easternstate.org/halloween/.

Temple Update’s Senior Send Off: Spring Class of 2017

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As is tradition here at Temple Update, we say farewell to our seniors through a montage at the end of the semester. This spring, 24 seniors will walk through studio 3 one last time before they are handed their diplomas. Take a look at some of our fondest memories of the class of 2017.

All of us here at Temple Update are so proud of our colleagues, and wish them the best in their future endeavors.

Tyler Carnival Drops in During Finals Week

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The spring 2017 semester has come to a close and with it comes the Tyler School of Art annual carnival.

The carnival celebrates the work students have made over the course of the semester and helps alleviate the stress that comes with finals week.

“The Tyler Carnival, I always look forward to it. I mean this event, I tell everyone it’s one of the better events of the year,” says Nathan McKeever, third year painting major at Tyler School of Art.

Walking through the doors of Tyler and out to the courtyard comes a day of fun full of free food, prizes, and entertainment for students and seniors hoping to end their college years with a bang. The carnival also presents an opportunity for seniors to give back to the school that has been a part of them for so long.

The tradition of Senior Giving, also known as the Senior Class Gift also took place at the carnival, emphasizing donations as road of confidence in Temple University and Tyler School of Art.

“So every year it is kind of a tradition for seniors to make a gift back to the university. It’s a way of paying it forward. So by you making a gift, you’re not only saying ‘hey Temple’s awesome’, but you’re kind of sharing with others how awesome Temple is as well by making our rankings go higher and higher,” says Nikki Torchon of Temple University.

Students who donate are calculated into the alumnus participation rate, a number that ties in to the national ranking of the university itself compared to other colleges. So even if you missed the carnival, Senior Giving will be available all around campus at various events through the end of the semester.

Given the popularity the carnival has had, it has become a place for students to spend their last few days with the friends they’ve cultivated over the years and give back to the university.

Thursdays at Saige Cafe

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The Saige Cafe is normally a place to grab coffee and study, but Bell Tower Music transformed it into a mini concert hall on Thursday, April 20th with their monthly event, Thursdays at Saige Cafe.

Local artists were selected by the student run record label to perform their live pieces, which include rapping, singing, instrumentals, and poetry, such as work from spoken word artist, Jasmine Kenny. “I’m just really into documenting the black experience, black womanhood, everything we go through. I just really want it to show through my art and things I have to say,” says Kenny.

Listeners enjoyed the atmosphere as performers took the stage to showcase their musical talents and promote their most recent projects. Some performers were artists who may have a chance to sign with Bell Tower Music, like female pop artist Xilomen. “My sister is actually a student in the class and she showed my music to the class, and I guess they want me to sign with them. So, this is my first show with them,” says Xilomen.

Anyone interested in attending the next Saige Cafe concert or being a part of Bell Tower Music can check out more information on BellTowerMusic.org

Museum Commemorating American Revolution Opens in Old City

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History enthusiasts rejoice!

The Museum of the American Revolution opened its doors for the first time Wednesday, the 242nd anniversary of the first shots of the revolution.

Vice President of Collections, Exhibition and Programming Dr. Scott Stephenson gave us a look at what those visiting the museum would get to see.

The museum has over fifteen rooms and theaters filled with artifacts, interactive exhibits, and immersive experiences, including a 4-D experience of the Battle of Brandywine, which includes flashing lights, puffs of smoke, and shaking floors.

”We’re going to line you up as if your in the continental army company,” said Stephenson, as we marched into the battle.

One of the most exciting parts of the museum, in Stephenson’s opinion, is the tent that belonged to General Washington. It was acquired in 1909 by an Episcopal priest, Reverend Herbert Burk, with the hopes of creating a museum to memorialize the American Revolution.

“It’s unlike anything you will ever see in any other museum,” said Stephenson

My favorite part? The Liberty Tree.

A Liberty Tree is where colonists would gather to protest the Stamp Act or post signs against the monarchy, a form of social media long before there was even the thought of internet.

Dr. Stephenson pointed out a special part of the MAR Liberty Tree to us as we walked by: within the replica tree is a panel of wood from the last known Liberty Tree – a Tulip Poplar from Annapolis, Maryland.

This museum is 17 years in the making, but those I spoke with told me it was all worth the wait.

“I thought it was wonderful, especially a couple of places where we actually gasped in delight,” said Cynthia Jacobus.

“It shows the whole gambit of the revolution…they’ve done an amazing job of really telling the story from the bottom up,” said historical re-enactor John Rees.