Museum Commemorating American Revolution Opens in Old City

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History enthusiasts rejoice!

The Museum of the American Revolution opened its doors for the first time Wednesday, the 242nd anniversary of the first shots of the revolution.

Vice President of Collections, Exhibition and Programming Dr. Scott Stephenson gave us a look at what those visiting the museum would get to see.

The museum has over fifteen rooms and theaters filled with artifacts, interactive exhibits, and immersive experiences, including a 4-D experience of the Battle of Brandywine, which includes flashing lights, puffs of smoke, and shaking floors.

”We’re going to line you up as if your in the continental army company,” said Stephenson, as we marched into the battle.

One of the most exciting parts of the museum, in Stephenson’s opinion, is the tent that belonged to General Washington. It was acquired in 1909 by an Episcopal priest, Reverend Herbert Burk, with the hopes of creating a museum to memorialize the American Revolution.

“It’s unlike anything you will ever see in any other museum,” said Stephenson

My favorite part? The Liberty Tree.

A Liberty Tree is where colonists would gather to protest the Stamp Act or post signs against the monarchy, a form of social media long before there was even the thought of internet.

Dr. Stephenson pointed out a special part of the MAR Liberty Tree to us as we walked by: within the replica tree is a panel of wood from the last known Liberty Tree – a Tulip Poplar from Annapolis, Maryland.

This museum is 17 years in the making, but those I spoke with told me it was all worth the wait.

“I thought it was wonderful, especially a couple of places where we actually gasped in delight,” said Cynthia Jacobus.

“It shows the whole gambit of the revolution…they’ve done an amazing job of really telling the story from the bottom up,” said historical re-enactor John Rees.

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